Kirsten Henderson

Centre for Biodiversity Theory and Modelling
Station d’Ecologie Théorique et Expérimentale du CNRS
09200 Moulis, France

Phone: +33 (0) 5 61 04 03 60
Email: kirsten.henderson@sete.cnrs.fr



Research interest

My primary research interests lie in the mathematical applications of complex ecological systems, with a focus on coupled human-environment dynamics. Human activities, including agriculture, forestry and livestock management, contribute to widespread conversion of natural ecosystems to cultivated areas at the expense of ecosystem services. As human populations continue to expand, the scope and magnitude of human influence on natural ecosystems also grows, potentially crossing planetary boundaries and destabilizing local and/or global systems.

Sustainable land management, in the form of policies, subsidies, and social norms, provides an alternative to the commonly perceived and historically observed deleterious relationship between humans and the environment. To gain a better understanding of how natural and converted systems respond to changes in ecological and social conditions and what is needed for sustainable management, my work incorporates social processes regarding conservation and economic land valuation and environmental demographic processes.



Summary CV

- 2016 - 2018 – Postdoctoral fellow, CNRS Moulis, France.

- 2013 - 2016 – Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph, Canada.

- 2013 - 2016 – Ph.D. Affiliate Researcher in Disturbance Ecology, Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Canada

- 2008 - 2013 – B.Sc. in Biological Sciences and Mathematics, University of Guelph, Canada



Publications

 

  • Henderson K.A., Reis M., Blanco C.C., Pillar V.D., Printes R.C., Bauch C.T., Anand M. (2016) — Landowner perceptions of the value of natural forest and natural grasslands in a mosaic ecosystem in southern Brazil. Sustainability Science. 11(2):321-330.
  • Henderson K.A., Anand M., Bauch C.T. (2013) — Carrot or Stick? Modelling How Landowner Behavioural Responses Can Cause Incentive-Based Forest Governance to Backfire. PLoS ONE. 8(10): e77735.